Project Dashboard

Flora of the Canadian Arctic (149347)
Proposal Status: Conformity Determination Issued
Project Overview
Type of application: New
Proponent name: Lynn Gillespie
Company: Canadian Museum of Nature
Schedule:
Start Date: 2020-07-05
End Date: 2020-08-10
Operation Type: Seasonal
Project Description:
Vascular Plant and Lichen Biodiversity of the Canadian Arctic Arctic regions of the world are among the most rapidly changing on the planet, in response to global climate change, substantial changes to Arctic vegetation are being documented by scientists. Understanding the composition and distribution of the Arctic flora in the past and present is critical to documenting change in the future. This research program aims to increase our knowledge of the Canadian Arctic flora through floristic and systematic studies of Arctic vascular plants and lichens. We are working to document where Arctic vascular plant and lichen species occur in time and space, to increase knowledge of their identities (i.e., taxonomy), building on the substantial body of work that has been contributed by researchers in the past, and to understand the evolutionary history of a subset of the flora. Such research is essential in serving as a basis for biodiversity, ecological, conservation, and environmental impact studies. This project will provide comprehensive baseline data on Arctic lichens and vascular plants (taxonomy, distribution, ecology), with the goal of producing a complete flora. It builds on our extensive, ongoing work on the Arctic flora (see summary of our recent research progress in Appendix B), and continues the strong, century-long tradition of Arctic botany at the Canadian Museum of Nature (CMN), the only Canadian institution with major plant and lichen systematic research activities in the Arctic. Arctic Flora Detailed information of the taxonomy and distributions of Arctic flora is necessary to understand potential impacts of environmental change on Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. Unfortunately, most previous regional Arctic floras are now out of print and very out of date, and there is no single publication or digital resource available that can provide up-to-date knowledge on the Canadian Arctic flora. Although the Arctic region is a major part of Canadian natural heritage, with the area above tree line in Canada comprising approximately 40% of the country, a flora treating all the vascular plants across the whole Canadian Arctic region has never been produced. The objectives of our research are to revise, develop, increase and disseminate the taxonomic knowledge base for the Arctic flora. Our research focus is broad, examining the big picture of understanding Arctic plant and lichen biodiversity in Canada: what are the species, and where do they occur? Our immediate objective is to synthesize existing collection-based knowledge, and to gather new knowledge on Arctic plants and lichens by undertaking work in areas of the Canadian Arctic that are botanically poorly known. Arctic Floristics Vascular Plants: We are conducting field work in botanically understudied areas of the Canadian Arctic to develop new and comprehensive baseline data for these areas, contributing to our understanding of species distributions and diversity in the Canadian Arctic as a whole. Our eight Arctic field seasons since 2008 have resulted in over 10000 new plant collections, which are deposited in the National Herbarium and other herbaria in Canada and internationally. We also collect silica-gel dried material for every collection of Arctic plant and lichen for use in molecular research. For each area we work in, we aim to produce a detailed floristic account of the vascular plants of the area, based on all collections made there, including ours and those made by previous researchers. Lichens: In the Canadian Arctic, many lichens are conspicuous and abundant. As a result, the large charismatic species have been somewhat widely collected by expedition teams sampling opportunistically, but most of the region has not been examined by a professional lichenologist. Many lichen species are inconspicuous and often overlooked, and while 1750 lichens have been reported in the circumpolar Arctic, only 1026 species are known from the North American Arctic. The similar large-scale environmental conditions throughout the Arctic suggest that the 724 species occurring elsewhere are likely in the Canadian Arctic. Substantial work remains in order to understand lichen diversity in the Canadian Arctic. 2020 Fieldwork in Nunavut In 2020 we will partner with Nunavut Parks and Special Places to conduct a botanical inventory of Agguttinni Territorial Park near Clyde River, Baffin Island. We plan to conduct field work in July and August studying the plants and lichens in the Park and in the vicinity of the community of Clyde River (see map in Appendix A). Specifically, we will work in and around: 1.Clyde River and surrounding area [70.4747N°, -68.5865W°] 5 July – 10 August 2020 (approximate time, before and after fieldwork in the Park). 2.Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter locations opposite Sillem Island on Gibbs Fiord [70.8488°N, -72.2381°W] and at the head of Gibbs Fiord [70.610589°, -72.551060°], 12-18 July 2020. 3.Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter locations at Tingijattut (Walker Arm) [70.6186N°, -71.5923W°]and Swiss Bay on Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti (formerly Sam Ford Fiord) [70.5473N°, -71.0296W°], 19-25 July 2020. 4.Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter locations at the head of Arviqtujuq Kangiqtua (formerly Eglinton Fiord) [70.485771°, -70.521922°] and Caribou Pass [70.3718N°, -70.5935W°], 26-1 Aug 2020. At sites 2, 3, and 4, we will camp at one (or both) of the proposed shelter sites and comprehensively survey the area during the week we plan to spend in that part of the park. Previous collecting within the proposed park boundaries has been very limited. During the 1950 Baffin Island Expedition led by P.D. Baird, V.C. Wynne-Edwards made scattered collections at the head of Arviqtujuq Kangiqtua (formerly Eglinton Fiord), while Hans Rothesberger and Pierre Dansereau made a few collections at Swiss Bay, Arviqtujuq Kangiqtua, and Gee Lake in the interior of the proposed park. In 2012, Julian Starr, then with the Canadian Museum of Nature, made two collections of Carex in the areas around Swiss Bay, while on a Students on Ice Expedition. In 2017 Yemisi Dare, a Canadian Museum of Nature Scientist on the Canada C3 expedition, made 36 vascular plant and 32 lichen collections at Tingijattut on the western arm of Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti (formerly Sam Ford Fiord) and at Ravenscraig Harbour on the eastern shore of Arviqtujuq Kangiqtua (formerly Eglinton Fiord), representing the most intense collecting effort in the park area to date. This proposal therefore focuses on providing the first comprehensive documentation on the vascular plant and lichen diversity of Agguttinni Territorial Park. Comprehensive botanical knowledge of the park is important to understand the natural history of the area and track future changes in species distribution, as well as to inform management decisions. References 1.Baird, P.D., Kranck, E.H., Goldthwait, R.P., Eade, K.E., Ward, W.H., Riley, G.C., Orvig, S., Montgomery, M.R., Dansereau, P. and Hale, M.E., 1950. Baffin Island expedition, 1950: a preliminary report. Arctic, 3(3), pp.130-149. Objectives: Our overall goals are to gain a more complete understanding of the present state of the distribution and composition of the Canadian arctic flora and to expand the knowledge base for understanding the broad-scale impacts of environmental change on the arctic flora. Specifically in 2020 our goal is to initiate a detailed botanical inventory of Agguttinni Territorial Park. The data and specimens collected on this trip will be used in support of several research projects: 1.a floristic study of the collected areas, published in a peer-reviewed journal; 2.the Arctic Flora of Canada and Alaska project, led by the Canadian Museum of Nature, which will treat all vascular plants in the entire Canadian Arctic and the North Slope of Alaska (http://arcticplants.myspecies.info/) 3.DNA barcoding studies of the Arctic flora (e.g., Saarela et al. 2013); 4.Ongoing and future taxonomic/systematic studies of Arctic lichen and plant species. Once incorporated into herbaria, the specimens will be available to all scientists for study, and the data will be shared internationally through digital biodiversity repositories, such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Collections Online website at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Management Implications: Our research will provide new and up-to-date information on vascular plant and lichen diversity in Agguttinni Territorial Park, all of which will be made available to Nunavut Parks and Special Places and the community of Clyde River. This baseline information will inform future land management plans related to plants in the region and will providing data crucial to measuring the effects of climate change and development within the studied areas. Management Implications Our research will provide new and up-to-date information on lichen and vascular plant diversity in the Canadian High Arctic. This baseline information will inform future land management plans related to plants in the region, providing data crucial to measuring the effects of climate change and development within the studied areas. Specimen Collecting Methods We will undertake research in the vicinities of each site by foot, complete plant inventories of all lichens and vascular plants, and collect data on conservation status, ecology, distribution, and population variation as appropriate. All of these data will be useful for long-term monitoring of potential changes in species diversity in the future. Approximately 1000 vascular plant specimens will be collected, photographed, and studied. Collections will be deposited at the National Herbarium of Canada (Canadian Museum of Nature), and duplicate specimens will be provided to Nunavut Parks and Special Places and also distributed to national and international herbaria, all contributing to the permanent scientific record documenting the distributions of Arctic lichen and plant species in time and space. As time permits we will make occasional collections of algae, fungi and bryophytes. Lichen specimens are collected from the environment by hand, using a small knife, or by using a hammer and chisel for crustose (rock-growing) specimens. These lichens are dried in the field in paper bags. Vascular plant specimens are collected and placed in a plant press, the standard method that botanists have used for several centuries. Once collected, plant specimens are arranged onto sheets of newspaper, placed between two pieces of cardboard, piled up, placed in a plant press, and tightened with two straps. The specimens are flattened and dried in the press; once dry they will last for centuries when stored in a herbarium (dried plant collection). For each collection event we: Collect one to several individuals of a species (depending on the size of an individual, and how common the species is locally). If a species is not common, we collect only enough material to properly document its occurrence at the site. If a species is rare, we do not collect any specimens, and document its occurrence only with photographs. Record detailed notes on the location of the species, its local growing conditions, and other species that grow at the site. For most collections we take photographs of the species growing in its natural state. Preserve a small amount of tissue from the specimen in silica gel (a desiccant), which rapidly dries the genetic material in the leaf tissue in a way that is suitable for later study (e.g., DNA sequencing) in the molecular laboratory.
Personnel:
Persons: 5
Days: 27
Project Map
List of all project geometries:
ID Geometry Location Name
6285 point Clyde River and surrounding area
6286 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location opposite Sillem Island on Gibbs Fiord.
6287 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location at the head of Gibbs Fiord.
6292 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location at Tingijattut (Walker Arm).
6293 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location at Swiss Bay on Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti (formerly Sam Ford Fiord).
6294 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location at the head of Arviqtujuq Kangiqtua (formerly Eglinton Fiord).
6295 point Agguttinni Territorial Park proposed shelter location at Caribou Pass.
Planning Regions:
Kivalliq
Affected Areas and Land Types
Municipal
Extablished National or Territorial Park
Settlement Area
North Baffin Planning Region
Project Land Use and Authorizations
Project Land Use
Scientific Research
Temporary Structures
Licensing Agencies
NWB: Approval to Use Water/Deposit Water Without a Licence
GN-Parks: 0
GN-DOE: Wildlife Research Permit
Other Licensing Requirements
No data found.
Material Use
Equipment
Type Quantity Size Use
Tents 6-7 2 m x 2 m 6-7 non permanent tents will make up our field camp at each site. No permanent structures will be erected, and all projects materials will be removed from all sites before completion of the project.
Fuel Use
Type Container(s) Capacity UOM Use
Other 3 4 Liters White gas (naphtha) [Coleman camp fuel] for cooking.
Hazardous Material and Chemical Use
Type Container(s) Capacity UOM Use
No records found.
Water Consumption
Daily Amount (m3) Retrieval Method Retrieval Location
0.025 buckets and pails freshwater streams and ponds in study area
Waste and Impacts
Environmental Impacts
Environmental impact resulting from this work will be minimal. We minimize garbage (food packaging) taken into the field – whatever we pack in, we pack out. We will use pit toilets and grey water pits while in the park, set well back from freshwater sources. Specimens are taken from the soil while minimizing disturbance to the surrounding vegetation and land. All temporary camps erected as a part of this research will be completely removed at the end of the field season.
Waste Management
Waste Type Quantity Generated Treatement Method Disposal Method
Sewage (human waste) minimal n/a Will be buried
Greywater 0.025 m3/day n/a Will dump grey water at least 50 m from water sources
Category: Application related document - Conformity Determination Letter
Recieved: 2020-04-14
Originator: Goump Djalogue
Public Registry ID: 17706
Document Size: 244.8 Kb

NORTH BAFFIN QUESTIONAIRE

GENERAL
Environmental Protection:
s3.13.8: The applicant undertakes to prevent any new occurrences of pollution, garbage and contamination at the site of the development.
YES

Removal of Fuel Drums:
s3.13.8: The applicant undertakes to remove all drums safely from the site and dispose of the drums in a safe manner.
YES

New Site Restoration and Clean Up:
s3.13.1 and Appendix H, s1: The applicant undertakes to clean up the site and restore the site to its natural condition to the greatest extent possible.
YES

Old Site Restoration and Clean Up:
s3.13.2: The applicant undertakes to clean up the site and restore the site to its original condition to the greatest extent possible, including any work required due to the applicant's action prior to this application.
YES

Low-Level Air Flights:
Appendix H, s3: Will the applicant avoid all low-level flights?
YES

Caribou Protection Measures:
s3.3.7 and Appendix D: Will the applicant comply with the Caribou Protection Measures outlined in section 2.4.6 and in Appendix D?
YES

Caribou Water Crossings:
s3.3.7 and map: Will the applicant avoid, between may 15 and September 1, to construct any camp, cache any fuel or conduct any blasting within 10 km of any Designated Caribou Water Crossing identified
YES

Polar Bear Denning Areas and Walrus Haul-outs:
s3.3.8: Will the applicant keep its activities away from any polar bear denning area or walrus haul-out?
YES

HERITAGE RESOURCES
Reporting of Archaeological Sites:
s3.11.3 and Appendix H, s2 and s8: Will the applicant immediately report the discovery of all suspected archaeological sites to the Department of Culture, Language, Elders and Youth (GN)?
YES

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Scientific Research:
s3.9.3: Does the project proposal involve scientific research?
YES
If yes, will the applicant integrate all available and relevant local and traditional knowledge when conducting its research?
YES

Consultation with Nunavut Research Institute:
s3.9.5: Has the applicant consulted with the Nunavut Research Institute about research topics that would benefit or interest local residents?
NO
ii. If no, explain why.
Nunavut Parks staff will communicate with the Clyde River Community Joint Planning and Management Committee and the Nunavut Joint Planning and Management Committee regarding our proposed botanical inventory project and seek feedback, as this is the most appropriate venue for Nunavut Parks. Upon completion of field work (either immediately or sometime after), another meeting will be held to share the results of the findings with the Clyde River Community Joint Planning and Management Committee, the community, and elders.
Local Services and Local Employment:
s3.9.4: Will the applicant rely on local services and employment where possible?
YES
i. Describe the services retained and the people to be employed.
We plan to hire one to two polar bear monitors/guides and one assistant from Clyde River (arrangements will be made by Nunavut Parks and Special Places).

Communication on Scientific Research:
s3.2.8: The applicant will, at minimum, translate a summary of its work into Inuktitut and communicate with communities using language that is clear and non-technical. The results of all scientific re
YES