Project Dashboard

Arctic coastal and drifting ice processes and dynamics (149813)
Proposal Status: Conformity Determination Issued
Project Overview
Type of application: Amendment
Proponent name: Derek Mueller
Company: Carleton University, Dept of Geography
Schedule:
Start Date: 2022-07-05
End Date: 2027-12-31
Operation Type: Seasonal
Project Description:
Changes in Arctic climate have profound implications for the break-up of coastal ice. In the recent past, there have been large calving events of ice shelves and glaciers that have produced many vast ice islands and icebergs that drift through Nunavut waters. Our research is focused on understanding how various types of coastal ice interact with the atmosphere above, the ocean below as well as meltwater and glacier ice from the adjacent land. In particular, we are interested in how both thick ice (ice tongues, ice shelves) and thin ice (landfast sea ice and lake ice) are melting and breaking-up in a changing climate. In addition, we study how large ice masses (icebergs and ice islands) that break away from the coast, drift and deteriorate. To conduct our research, we place instruments in the water to measure temperature, salinity and water currents; we measure the temperature and melting rate of ice using dataloggers, ice-penetrating radar and ablation stakes; we also measure air temperature, wind and solar radiation to examine energy input to ice. We employ technologies such as satellite tracking beacons and remote sensing to examine ice drift, passive seismometers to record ice movements, as well as uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to make precise maps of the ice and take water measurements under-ice. Some of our research takes place at the northern coast of Ellesmere Island where there are extensive ice shelves and ice tongues. Our study of drifting icebergs and ice islands occurs where they go, which is typically within the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Lancaster Sound and along the east coast of Ellesmere, Devon and Baffin islands. We hope to work out of and with eastern Baffin Island communities where icebergs drift by. We are also planning to study flat and ridged landfast sea ice near these communities. We access our far northern site from small camps that are established using Twin Otter and helicopter, we visit ice islands and icebergs by ship, boat and helicopter but also work from communities to access ice by snow machine or small boats. The data we collect will eventually be available in public repositories following dissemination of results to communities and in the peer-reviewed literature.
Summary of Modifications:
Seeking permission to core sediment at the bottom of Milne Fiord and to determine the rate of sedimentation in the fjord as additional activities to complement our research.
Personnel:
Persons: 7
Days: 14
Project Map
List of all project geometries:
ID Geometry Location Name
9071 polygon Ice island, iceberg and landfast ice research area [offshore areas only]
9072 polygon Ellesmere ice shelf, ice tongue, glacier, and fjord research area
Planning Regions:
Qikiqtani
Kivalliq
Affected Areas and Land Types
Inuit Owned Surface Lands
Municipal
Extablished National or Territorial Park
Settlement Area
North Baffin Planning Region
Project Land Use and Authorizations
Project Land Use
Scientific Research
Licensing Agencies
NTI:
NIRB:
NRI: 0
Other Licensing Requirements
No data found.
Material Use
Equipment
Type Quantity Size Use
Ice auger 1-3 2 to 8 diameter drilling holes in ice
Ice corer 1 5 taking short ice cores
ice-penetrating radar 3 50 cm x 50 cm Measures ice thickness
Tracking beacons 2-5 per year 40 cm x 40 cm Tracking the position of drifting ice
Automated weather station 4-5 2-3 m tall Measure temperature, wind, solar radiation, ice melt/snow fall
Ablation stakes 2-5 per year 3 m x 3 cm Stakes positioned in the ice to measure melt
Uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) 1-2 50 cm diam Mapping of ice features via stereo photography
GPS receivers 2-3 20 cm Accurate positionning and velocity measurements
Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) 1 60 cm x 80 cm Mapping and measuring water properties under ice
Autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) 1 2 m x 25 cm Mapping and measuring water properties under ice
Hole melter 1 1.5 x 1 x 1 m Melting access holes through ice for instruments
Current meter/profiler 1-3 50 cm x 30 cm Measure water currents
Temperature data loggers 10-20 1 x 10 cm Measure temperature in water and ice
Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) datalogger/profiler 2-4 40 cm x 5 cm Measure water properties
Helicopter 1 15 m x 5 m x 3 m Transport
Twin Otter 1 20 x 20 x10 m Transport
Snowmobile 0-2 1 x 2 m x 80 cm Transport (at times)
Icebreaker/ship 1 100 m Transport to field site
Generator 1-2 30 x 50 x 20 cm Power generation
Kemmerer Bottle 1-2 50 cm x 10 cm Water sampling
Small boats/launches 1 10 m Accessing ice islands or icebergs and surveying
Seismometer 4-6 20 x 20 x 20 cm Record ice movement
Sediment corer 1 2 m x 0.5 m x 0.5 m To core sediment at the bottom of the fiord (ocean floor)
Sediment traps 5 40 x 10 cm Collects falling sediment in the ocean (attached to a mooring line)
Fuel Use
Type Container(s) Capacity UOM Use
Aviation fuel 6 200 Liters Helicopter cache (Ellesmere Is)
Diesel 2 200 Liters Ice melting/power generation
Propane 3 20 Liters Cooking/heating
Gasoline 3 25 Liters Generator/snowmobiles
Hazardous Material and Chemical Use
Type Container(s) Capacity UOM Use
hazardous 10 0.25 Liters Powering UAVs, tracking beaons and some other instruments
Formalin (5%) 1 1 Liters Mixed with hypersaline water. 100 mL used as a preservative at the bottom of sediment traps to prevent organic matter from decaying. (5 sediment traps)
Water Consumption
Daily Amount (m3) Retrieval Method Retrieval Location
0 Scooping Streams, ponds and lakes on land (Ellesmere Is), glaciers or floating ice
Waste and Impacts
Environmental Impacts
See attached
Waste Management
Waste Type Quantity Generated Treatement Method Disposal Method
Sewage (human waste) 4 kg per day incineration in nearest community Removal from site
Greywater 25 L per day N/A pour in sump away from lakes and streams; dispose of on ice so that it drains into the ocean
Combustible wastes 1 kg per day incineration in nearest community removal from site
Non-Combustible wastes 1 kg per day disposal in nearest community removal from site
Category: Application form attachment - Other Authorizations
Recieved: 2017-02-17
Originator: Derek Mueller
Public Registry ID: 20160
Document Size: 591.82 Kb
Category: Application form attachment - Other Authorizations
Recieved: 2017-02-17
Originator: Derek Mueller
Public Registry ID: 20161
Document Size: 620.53 Kb
Category: Application form attachment - Project description
Recieved: 2017-02-17
Originator: Derek Mueller
Public Registry ID: 20158
Document Size: 177.61 Kb
Category: Application form attachment - Project description
Recieved: 2017-02-17
Originator: Derek Mueller
Public Registry ID: 20159
Document Size: 46.05 Kb
Category: Application related document - Conformity Determination Letter
Recieved: 2017-02-28
Originator: Goump Djalogue
Public Registry ID: 20162
Document Size: 618.72 Kb
Category: Application related document - Conformity Determination Letter
Recieved: 2022-06-09
Originator: Adrian Gerhartz
Public Registry ID: 20386
Document Size: 258.57 Kb
2022-05-19 13:19:06, from: Derek Mueller
 Dear NPC, I am seeking to amend my research licence/permissions required to conduct additional fieldwork tasks during this summer's field season (July 5). We are hoping to take 4-8 sediment cores at the bottom of Milne Fiord (the ocean bottom). In addition we would like to use a preservative to keep organic matter from decaying inside sediment traps on our mooring. I have corresponded with DFO and they do not require permits to do these things. Therefore I am seeking an NPC conformity determination and advice on further steps needed to conduct our work. Many thanks, Derek

2022-05-19 13:19:13, from: Derek Mueller
 Dear NPC, I am seeking to amend my research licence/permissions required to conduct additional fieldwork tasks during this summer's field season (July 5). We are hoping to take 4-8 sediment cores at the bottom of Milne Fiord (the ocean bottom). In addition we would like to use a preservative to keep organic matter from decaying inside sediment traps on our mooring. I have corresponded with DFO and they do not require permits to do these things. Therefore I am seeking an NPC conformity determination and advice on further steps needed to conduct our work. Many thanks, Derek

NORTH BAFFIN QUESTIONAIRE

GENERAL
Environmental Protection:
s3.13.8: The applicant undertakes to prevent any new occurrences of pollution, garbage and contamination at the site of the development.
YES

Removal of Fuel Drums:
s3.13.8: The applicant undertakes to remove all drums safely from the site and dispose of the drums in a safe manner.
YES

New Site Restoration and Clean Up:
s3.13.1 and Appendix H, s1: The applicant undertakes to clean up the site and restore the site to its natural condition to the greatest extent possible.
YES

Old Site Restoration and Clean Up:
s3.13.2: The applicant undertakes to clean up the site and restore the site to its original condition to the greatest extent possible, including any work required due to the applicant's action prior to this application.
YES

Low-Level Air Flights:
Appendix H, s3: Will the applicant avoid all low-level flights?
NO
i. If not, explain why such flights are or may be absolutely necessary.
At times we will be using uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones). To comply with Transport Canada regulations they must be flown at low level (<100m). These are not as noisy as full sized aircraft and we can easily avoid disturbing wildlife and people by flying where they are not present. We will also use helicopters at times to accomplish the same goal but they will be flown above 610 m.
ii. If such flights are or may be absolutely necessary, will they avoid disturbance to people and wildlife?
YES
iii. If not, explain why it is not possible to avoid such disturbance.

Caribou Protection Measures:
s3.3.7 and Appendix D: Will the applicant comply with the Caribou Protection Measures outlined in section 2.4.6 and in Appendix D?
YES

Caribou Water Crossings:
s3.3.7 and map: Will the applicant avoid, between may 15 and September 1, to construct any camp, cache any fuel or conduct any blasting within 10 km of any Designated Caribou Water Crossing identified
YES

Polar Bear Denning Areas and Walrus Haul-outs:
s3.3.8: Will the applicant keep its activities away from any polar bear denning area or walrus haul-out?
YES

HERITAGE RESOURCES
Reporting of Archaeological Sites:
s3.11.3 and Appendix H, s2 and s8: Will the applicant immediately report the discovery of all suspected archaeological sites to the Department of Culture, Language, Elders and Youth (GN)?
YES

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Scientific Research:
s3.9.3: Does the project proposal involve scientific research?
YES
If yes, will the applicant integrate all available and relevant local and traditional knowledge when conducting its research?
YES

Consultation with Nunavut Research Institute:
s3.9.5: Has the applicant consulted with the Nunavut Research Institute about research topics that would benefit or interest local residents?
YES
i. Describe the results of your consultation.
We are in ongoing discussion with the communities of Resolute, Grise Fiord, Arctic Bay and Pond Inlet.
Local Services and Local Employment:
s3.9.4: Will the applicant rely on local services and employment where possible?
YES
i. Describe the services retained and the people to be employed.
We regularly employ local team members and will do so again when possible. This is in a variety of capacities from guiding, translation, rental of vehicles, equipment to co-leadership on various funding applications.

Communication on Scientific Research:
s3.2.8: The applicant will, at minimum, translate a summary of its work into Inuktitut and communicate with communities using language that is clear and non-technical. The results of all scientific re
YES